An Introduction to Fibroid Tumors

Dr Keith Reisler pic

Dr Keith Reisler
Image: drreislerobgyn.com

As a privately practicing obstetrician and gynecologist (OBGYN) in Plano, Texas, Dr. Keith Reisler offers treatment for a comprehensive range of women’s health issues. Keith Reisler, MD, has treated many patients with fibroid tumors.

Most often benign, fibroid tumors develop in the uterus as a collection of smooth muscle cells. They usually grow slowly and are asymptomatic in approximately 75 percent of cases. They may appear as a single tumor or as a cluster and can vary dramatically in size, the smallest being only a single millimeter in diameter and the largest growing to more than 20 cm.

Fibroid tumors stand out as the most commonly diagnosed gynecological tumor in women. They are most common in women between the ages of 30 and 40, although they can appear in any female patient whose body is actively producing estrogen.

Fibroids that grow in the uterine lining may lead to heavy and extended bleeding in menstruation, while those that grow on the outside of the uterus are more likely be asymptomatic. However, these sub-serous fibroids tend to be the largest type of fibroid tumor. The final type of fibroid, the intramural fibroid, is significantly more common and can cause uterine bulging. The type of fibroid, as well as its degree of symptomatic presentation, can help an OBGYN to determine whether surgical or nonsurgical treatment can provide the best relief.

Treatments of Uterine Fibroids

Dr Keith Reisler pic

Dr Keith Reisler
Image: drreislerobgyn.com

Keith Reisler, MD, offers comprehensive OBGYN services at his Plano, Texas, practice. Among Dr. Keith Reisler’s many areas of expertise is the treatment of uterine fibroids, growths in the uterus that can cause pelvic pain and heavy periods, among other symptoms.

The type of treatment a doctor might prescribe for uterine fibroids depends on a number of factors, including the severity of the symptoms associated with them and whether or not the woman wants to have children in the future. In some cases where the fibroids aren’t causing symptoms, the initial approach might be to wait and monitor the issue.

Other times, the doctor might suggest medication, such as birth control, which can provide relief from discomfort and bleeding. Medications to control bleeding can also help when used immediately before or right at the start of the woman’s menstrual period.

Finally, different form of medication, called gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, can lessen the size of fibroids. It works by causing a temporary menopause, and the treatment period might last for up to six months. Since the effect doesn’t last once the doctor discontinues treatment, he or she might perform surgery afterwards. For more information on fibroids and their treatment options, a woman should speak with her doctor.